Recycled printmaking.

 

Something which is very important in my work is the amount of recycled materials I can possibly use in the process. I like the idea of making something beautiful from essentially rubbish. Thats why I love collagraph making as I tend to use old cardboard packets. another bonus of this is the fact that its a very cheap material, so the pressure of potentially messing up materials you have bought just for the task are not there.

 

 

fish starbucks cup fish

fish 2 starbucks cup fish

DSCF5957.JPG

These fish were made from a used coffee cup. the plastic coated card great for wiping ink off of.

Anybody else that have found recycled materials that are great for printmaking? or anything crafty really ?

thanks for reading.

Printmaking in the garden with a home made press!

I have posted a new video on my YouTube channel. I finally finished putting my pasta machine press together and thought I would try out printing from plants with it, and why not do it in the garden as it is a very mobile press!

So please check it out if interested.(Link below) I think the pasta press works remarkably well for soft thin items, like you would mono print with. The idea to mount it on its side came from Snake artist who has great fun art videos on you tube.

Monoprinting with a pasta machine

Cheers!

Viscosity printing on laser etched woodblock ?

Here I found a lasercut piece of mdf that was hanging around the workshop, and I thought I could use it to try a multi colour print.

It was engraved by the laser so I could of just inked it with a roller and printed, or printed it like an intaglio print. As there were different levels to the engraving I thought I would blend the techniques.

And at the time I thought I was doing viscosity printing but doing more research after, I did it slightly differently to the general way you apply ink in viscosity printing.

Viscosity printmaking is a way of applying different coloured ink onto the same plate, utilising the way ink will react to each other if they have different viscosity (thickness or oilyness)

Here is the plate after I had scraped yellow ink into it, as you would an etching or collograph plate. Yellow ink or at least the etching ink here is naturally runnier than other pigments, I don’t think I altered it with anything, thinking as it was going to be the lowest inked bits it wouldn’t matter ( not quite right!)

Then I wiped it with scrim…

Then I mixed an orange ,

I applied this layer of colour with a soft neoprene roller, the idea being the soft roller deposits the ink on some of the lower areas. When I rolled it over though, the orange covered most of the yellow I could see! Anyway I carried on with my next colour.

Contrasting pale blue I thought would pop out, and the idea behind viscosity printing is the layering of colours without them blending, so this colour would be a good test of that thought I.

Here is the plate before I rolled the blue on, which I made a stiff ink , by adding some chalk to, or magnesium carbonate works as well.

When I rolled the blue on with a firm roller, it did not stick very easily , because I had got the order muddled up. A stiff ink wont stick to an oily ink , but oily will stick to stiff.

Either way , into the relief press it went. I used damp paper and some felt blanket for a soft packing so the paper would be pressed into the blocks low places.

Here is one of the prints I took. I like the way the ink had blended on the highest points, but that wasn’t what I was going for. But cutting myself some slack, the ply wood had a textured surface so it wouldn’t have been a solid colour whatever I did perhaps .

It was an interesting block to ink up, and I learnt a lot about layering ink by doing it wrong and I’ve almost remembered the mantra stiff wont stick to oily… I think..

Thanks for reading, happy printmaking.